DIY Mattress Pad ??

3:59 p.m. on November 24, 2016 (EST)
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HAPPY THANKSGIVING,  gobble gobble

So as I sit here relaxing I had a thought and wanted to see if any of you have tried this.  I always wondered why a person could not make their own air mattress pad.  The materials are available, as are seam sealing methods.  I only think of this because it is fun to make your own stuff, but also because you could get a perfect size. Some of you are handy this way, making your own backpacks, tarps and tents.   

So has anyone tried this?  

Snakey

9:31 p.m. on November 24, 2016 (EST)
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One of the members at Backpackinglight, Bender, made his own and posted the results in the DIY forum.

People got excited about it so he started to make them for others.

About a year later he disappeared after I think finding out that the returns were killing his profits.

Another one, stated that he could make them lighter and much cheaper than those commercially available, started to buy fabrics and glues, went on experimenting for about a year , then also disappeared.

So, yes it can be done but make sure you don't get too carried away , it could end up being very expensive.

7:30 p.m. on November 25, 2016 (EST)
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Or you can sew a sheet together and fill it with dead leaves.

9:55 p.m. on November 25, 2016 (EST)
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I assume you are talking about an inflatable air pad, because there is nothing to "DIY" for a CCF pad other than buying the material and cutting to size if needed. I think making an inflatable sleeping pad from scratch would be very challenging, assuming you want it insulated. You need to research, source and then purchase multiple types of materials, you need the insulation layered in properly, you need to create chambers you need to install a valve, etc.

If you want an air pad that is smaller than the standard sizes it isn't too difficult to cut a manufactured one down to size and re-seal it.

10:34 a.m. on November 26, 2016 (EST)
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JRinGeorgia said:

....If you want an air pad that is smaller than the standard sizes it isn't too difficult to cut a manufactured one down to size and re-seal it.

 That is exactly what I was thinking of.  I feel that from a minimalist point of view having a full size pad is unnecessary. This coming from someone that used to (much younger) sleep right on the ground.  That said, a shorter wider version is what I would want as I just need support from the neck to the hips.  If you did try it, the donor pad would need to have the chambers oriented so that you were not blocking a return path.     

10:37 a.m. on November 26, 2016 (EST)
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ppine said:

Or you can sew a sheet together and fill it with dead leaves.

 Brilliant!  Did you ever do this?  My luck would be that there would be no leaves or trees.  :)  But you could do that as extra support for a lightweight pad.  

10:42 a.m. on November 26, 2016 (EST)
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Alps makes a short pad that would be good for what I want, 20 x 48 x 1.5, but it seems heavy for a "lightweight" pad.  

9:05 a.m. on November 27, 2016 (EST)
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Here's a video on how to trim an airpad:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kumSl-cbLlY

Keep in mind this will void your warranty.

8:40 p.m. on November 27, 2016 (EST)
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There are several "torso" sized pads on the market, Thermarest for example has some.

For example the XS version here :

http://www.cascadedesigns.com/therm-a-rest/mattresses/fast-and-light/prolite/product

8:52 a.m. on November 28, 2016 (EST)
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Thanks guys....that's just what I was looking for.

11:03 a.m. on November 28, 2016 (EST)
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Some hikers sleep on some of the more durable varieties of bubble wrap.  Its super light and, if you are careful, can provide a decent rest.

Mylar bubble wrap is used by more than a few and its pretty cheap and very lightand sort of warm.

1:17 p.m. on November 28, 2016 (EST)
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I think inflatables may be welded, not just seam sealed. 

8:19 a.m. on November 29, 2016 (EST)
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BigRed said:

I think inflatables may be welded, not just seam sealed. 

 What's the difference?

6:50 a.m. on November 30, 2016 (EST)
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Huge difference. Welding applies heat which essentially "melts" the two pieces of fabric together (see the video I posted a link to, he uses an iron to re-seal his cut pad). Seam sealing is the application of a bonding agent (think of a kind of glue) that "sticks" the two pieces together, which can work for keeping rain out (like seam sealing a tent or tarp) but doubtful it would create an air-tight bond that would last. Seam sealing generally is used to waterproof a seam that is held together by stitching, not by the seam-sealing itself.

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