Fjallraven Anorak No8

2:58 a.m. on February 1, 2018 (EST)
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Hi All,

I have been thinking of buying a Fjallraven No 8 Anorak...which is an expensive piece of kit.  As usual I peruse any reviews I can find however there seems to be very few reviews on line....the limited reviews I did read highlighted that once the jacket had been waxed it lost all of it's breathability.....which sort of makes sense.

Just wondering if anyone had had a view or experience of this before I waste some hard earned money that just won't cut it in wet Irish weather.

10:27 a.m. on February 1, 2018 (EST)
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I don't own this jacket, but I have used quite a few waxed cotton products over the years. To say the least I am a huge fan of them.

Now, on to this particular jacket. Why would you or anyone wax it? It isn't 100% cotton so it would defeat the purpose. I would think the only thing you would want to do to this product is apply a quality DWR coating if it doesn't already have one applied from the factory.

Waxing this product would definitely and significantly reduce breathability. Most polyester fabrics don't breathe well as is, so waxing one would just compound the issue I would think.

I also noticed that this jacket isn't insulated at all. What is your intended use of this jacket? It would obviously provide some warmth and good wind protection but it will be limited. I havn't used the below products but something like this might also fit the bill and they are true waxed cotton/canvas. Finding true, good, waxed cotton products are becoming harder and harder these days.

https://www.wintergreennorthernwear.com/collections/mens-jackets/products/waxed-cotton-trail-coat-mens?variant=151607607321

Barbour also has a good selection of waxed cotton outerwear

http://www.orvis.com/store/product_search_promote.aspx?keyword=waxed+cotton+jacket&sp_cs=UTF-8

8:28 a.m. on February 2, 2018 (EST)
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Hi,

Thanks for your input however Fjallraven advise that if you want the garment to be waterproof then they recommend you wax...I'm really not opposed to waxing but as I've previously mentioned breathability is an important element for me on a personal level to enjoy a day out on the hills.

I understand that a DWR coating may be an alternative but the manufacturer doesn't mention this procedure in any of their videos or blogs....only Greenland Wax.

I had been looking for a replacement for my Mountain Equipment Lhotse jacket which has served me well and has everything I need for wet Irish weather so it looks like the Fjallraven No8 is not for me.

Thanks for your thoughts and your time for replying.

Take Care,

Stephen.

8:52 a.m. on February 2, 2018 (EST)
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I understand that the company recommends waxing, similarly most car manufacturers recommend changing your oil every 3,000 miles... Your mileage will vary with both.

Waxing will work, but on that particular fabric I don't think it would accomplish the desired goal of having a waterproof and still fairly breathable fabric. It would definitely make it waterproof though. Waxing a blended fabric that is not the majority cotton kinda defeats the purpose. I wouldn't wax anything that wasn't at least approximately 75/25, with 100% being preferred. A lot of manufacturers will list somewhere around 75/25 because they don't use cotton thread for stitching, and or they add a very slight mix for durability purposes. As you get closer to 50/50 or reversing the cotton being the majority fabric the benefits of said fabric go down significantly in regards to waxing

While the company might not directly mention it, a DWR would 100% without a doubt work. There are many wash in or spray on treatment methods available.

Best of luck in your search for a jacket!

6:40 a.m. on February 3, 2018 (EST)
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Thanks again for your input.....totally agree.

Take Care,

Stephen 

8:57 p.m. on February 4, 2018 (EST)
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If you are in wet Irish weather I would look at the British brand, Paramo.  It seems ideally suited for that climate.

http://www.paramo-clothing.com/en-gb/

10:23 a.m. on February 19, 2018 (EST)
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Norrona sells a nice cotton anorak. Tightly woven cotton can be great for wind blocking while still giving you some ventilation  cotton obviously isnt great for wet weather. Waxed cotton will shed water but is relatively heavy and not good at venting interior moisture. You might look at rab's line of event jackets, like the latok or latok alpine, or the event or polartec neoshell jackets from westcomb or montane.

8:14 a.m. on March 2, 2018 (EST)
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Hi, I’ve been wearing Fjallraven jackets since I was 5 when my dad got my sister and I matching UN colored jackets;). I currently have the Kep jacket and the Greenland No1 jacket and multiple pants. First I would mention that I haven’t owened any of the Fjallraven number products which i believe are made of thicker, heavier  and more luxurious materials. The Fjallraven Greenland No1 jacket I use daily in the city as a windbreaker.  I like it because of it’s perfect sized breastpockets and i think it’s stylish. The Kep jacket I use only for winter hiking when its cold and no chance of rain (20 to -20F). I haven’t waxed any of them, but mayby I’ll recoat the Kep at some point if needed on the shoulder area, but I like to keep it as breathable as possible since that’s why I use it. I like that my body can easily get rid of moist which is extra Important in the winter. I’d never use any of the g1000 fabric clothing purposely as raincloth even when  experimenting with putting several layer of was on the fabric using a hairdryer to melt the wax into the fabric, I’d still feel that water would penetrate if caught in a mountain rainstorm. I use a goretex jacket for the 3 rainy seasons. 

I thought the heavier Fjallraven number products looked cool when they came out, but started looking at the weight, ad the weight of the wax and then at the weight of the rain that immersing the fabric. I think a lightweigh goretex jacket that is 99% waterproof is a better solution when hiking. I hope this helps. 

2:24 a.m. on March 3, 2018 (EST)
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Thanks Nordic Runner, for the POV.  Your review was so detailed I thought at first you were a paid Fjallraven shill, but your candid observations on the gear limitations and best uses were the tel that you are legit and being square with us.

Ed

9:18 a.m. on March 13, 2018 (EDT)
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one other option, LL Bean sells a nylon anorak for sixty bucks. it's not waterproof, but mist and light rain will bead up a bit if you keep it treated. it is mostly windproof, but  you can feel some air through it. I'm giving it a whirl. the hood is so-so - fine worn over a ballcap, tending to drop down over your eyes otherwise, and the leather tabs and shoelace-style cords seem intended more for a college campus than full outdoors function, but it actually works well, and it's inexpensive. http://bit.ly/2Hv6l0A  

1:21 p.m. on April 5, 2018 (EDT)
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Review of the LL Bean Anorak, if it's of interest:  https://www.trailspace.com/gear/l.l.bean/mountain-classic-anorak/#review38672  

May 22, 2019
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