Newbie trying to decide?

7:33 p.m. on December 27, 2018 (EST)
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I am looking for a jacket that will repel water and snow, wind, I will be in the 15degree to 35 degree weather. Mainly in the Lake Tahoe Ca area but will be in Northern Idaho occasionally light hiking snowboarding. I don't really want to spend a lot of money I do know about base layering underneath

The two I have been looking at are 

Glacier Ridge Pro Series Winter Jacket                

Wandto Mountain Ski Jacket

7:56 p.m. on December 27, 2018 (EST)
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Actually you do want to spend a lot of money,or at least whatever it takes to get a suitable garment.  The best garment will not necessarily be expensive, but it won't be bargain basement, either.  A good jacket is ery fundamental gear, vital for adverse conditions.

Withstanding snow and wind is easily done, but adding really significant rain is a bit more difficult.

I have no knowledge of either of the ones you propose; just don't go cheap and buy junk that will not work.

10:33 p.m. on December 27, 2018 (EST)
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For the money I think it’s hard to beat a military ECWCS parka, specifically Gen 1. They’re incredibly durable, have large handwarmer & Napoleon pockets, a powder skirt, 2-way zipper with snapped storm flap, and pit zips. Heavy? Yep, but compared to other hardshells it’s like armor plate. 

2:30 p.m. on December 28, 2018 (EST)
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I would not buy either for your use.  Both are water repellent - suitable for around town or on the slopes, but if you spend a day far from your car and it rains, it eventually will soak through.  You want something that is waterproof, not simply water resistant.  Water proof garments usually use a rubber-like coating (e.g. urethane) or a membrane (e.g. Goretex to block water). 

You may know of the layering concept but not necessarily some of the rules of thumb.  In this case your outer layer is a shell garment, whose purpose is shedding wind (soft shell) and water (hard shell).  Choosing the proper shell one need consider its application.  In this case you are doing strenuous activity in moderately cold conditions. I often find myself shedding warm layers right down to my base layers in such circumstances, and find a shell with insulation to be too warm.  I prefer a shell that has no insulation (e.g. fleece linings) so I can still be protected from the wind and rain without overheating.

Ed  

3:32 p.m. on December 28, 2018 (EST)
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I am not familiar with either of those options.

I am assuming from the activities, esp. skiing, that when you say it repels water, you want a jacket that keeps water out but doesn't keep sweat in. you can buy pretty inexpensive coated nylon shells that will keep water out, but you'll get soaked from sweat skiing hard in those.  

outdoor research's interstellar jacket is an intriguing option if you're looking to save money. because it doesn't use gore tex or one of the other well-known waterproof/breathable membranes, it's fairly inexpensive (listed on a number of websites for about $225). it uses a similar concept that outdoor research apparently developed on its own. reviews of this have been outstanding:  

https://www.trailspace.com/gear/outdoor-research/interstellar-jacket/#review39451  

https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/clothing-mens/hardshell-jacket/outdoor-research-interstellar  

I tested a jacket that's waterproof/breathable and very reasonably priced.  didn't have lots of room for layering, but you could size up.  https://www.trailspace.com/gear/my-trail/storm-ul-jacket/#review38360  

9:40 a.m. on December 29, 2018 (EST)
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Pick one and look at the rest. 

10:58 p.m. on January 9, 2019 (EST)
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Hard to tell if you expect being in a pouring rain. If so, also get a really good waterproof/breathable shell. As for warm jackets, I find it astounding that no one’s mentioned Montane. Together with Montbell and Rab, Montane makes a range of extremely well-made down clothing. Their Black Ice jacket might fit your needs. 

Lately, I’ve been doing a ton or 10 of research into a new down parka. I have a good one for 25-30 F. and higher. But I wanted one for the monstrously frozen days that can happen in New England.  

March 21, 2019
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