Open main menu

Small diameter Kevlar cord

The stake and guyline loops on my Big Agnes tent are starting to fray where they rub against the edges of the stakes. Putting the stakes with the point of the V facing toward or away from the tent makes no difference, I think it’s just what happens with very thin cord (2mm-ish) used to stake out a tent. So I’m thinking Kevlar is pretty abrasion-resistant, but probably also quite a bit more expensive if it’s even made in that size. I’ve seen 10m lengths of 1.8mm cord from MSR, but have no idea how durable it is.

I’ve used this tent maybe 10 nights in all, I think I can get 3-5 more nights out of these but would like to do them ASAP. Am I overthinking things and should I just use standard nylon cord that gets replaced once or twice a year? Or is Kevlar the better/more practical way?

https://dutchwaregear.com/product/reflect-it/

I have guylines I made from a hank of this stuff 4.5 years ago that are still in service.

Kevlar is fine for loops; I'm not a fan of it for guy lines because it's slick, hard to get knots to stay put. 

I replace guy lines with 2.75mm Sterling GloCord - nice to when they're easily visible with a flashlight to avoid inadvertent trip and falls.  (they also sell it in 1.5mm and 2mm if you prefer a lighter duty cord - i went with 2.75 because it's the lightest-duty line with the glow strips).  

Thanks, Andrew, I did not know that about Kevlar. I’ve found plenty of 1.18mm and 1.8mm nylon/nylon blend reflective cord, both will likely be just as hard to tie with my fingers and eyes so I guess I’ll goby the price LOL

I find various tensioning devices work well with small diameter nylon guy lines.  They speed up setting and crashing camp, and you don't need good eyesight or dexterous fingers to operate.  Especially convenient in cold weather.

Ed.

6 of the guylines have tensioners that I’ll have to tie one end of the cord to, and they’ll all need knots where they attach to the tent, fly, and footprint. Maybe I can find a Boy Scout who knows a few knots (figure 8 should be fine) and who doesn’t have 52-year-old mechanic hands. Maybe forceps would work, too. 

Phil Smith said:

6 of the guylines have tensioners that I’ll have to tie one end of the cord to, and they’ll all need knots where they attach to the tent, fly, and footprint. Maybe I can find a Boy Scout who knows a few knots (figure 8 should be fine) and who doesn’t have 52-year-old mechanic hands. Maybe forceps would work, too. 

 https://www.trailspace.com/gear/dutchware/hookworm/#review39488

I keep the line tied to the stakes and attach a loop of shock cord to the tarp tie out points for hooking on to. Tension adjustment is fast and easy with no knots to tie or untie.

LoneStranger said:

I keep the line tied to the stakes and attach a loop of shock cord to the tarp tie out points for hooking on to. Tension adjustment is fast and easy with no knots to tie or untie.

 +1

My lines also are pre-staged.  A tensioning device is attached to each of the tie out points, with a line passing through the device.  the other end of the line has a loop facilitated by a pre-knotted slip knot.  All I do is drive the stakes, slip the end loops over the stakes and draw the guy lines taut using the tensioning devices.  When stakes can't be driven, I'll open the slip knot loop and slip over a dead man style anchor or large rock.  If can secure my tent wearing mittens, then surely even gnarled  mechanic's hands can muster the task with a similar setup.

Ed

Mine are pre-knotted, the problem I’m going to have is tying those knots at the tent and tensioners when I put the new lines on. Just tying my shoelaces can be a chore when my fingers don’t want to work. 

September 23, 2021
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply