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Gas Stove Vs Wood Stove Cooking System Comparison - Pros and Cons and Which One to Choose?

Gas Stove Vs Wood Stove Cooking System Comparison - Pros and Cons and Which One to Choose?

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In this video we are sharing the new gear comparison video and this time it is going to be the comparison of two different cooking systems – gas stove and a wood stove. We discovered the wood stove only this year and have been testing it a lot and the gas stove has been our go to cooking set up since the beginning so we have 3 years of experience with it. We thought it would be interesting to compare these two systems as they are quite different from each other and talk more about some pros and cons of the each one.

What is your preferred cooking system and why?

Gas.  Most of my camping is in the alpine zone, at or above tree line, so wood is hard to come by.  Additionally there are usually restrictions precluding wood fires, predicated on ecological conservation and wild fire prevention.

In any case I like to cook and simmer meals, something that is more a challenge than I care to address with a wood fire.

Ed

I never carry just the wood stove. Too many reasons not to use it in certain situations that it can't be my only stove. For the first half of this year's Cohos hike I paired my Emberlit with an alcohol burner which I swapped out for a canister stove for the second half so I didn't have to hassle with refilling fuel bottles on my day off. 

I prefer a gas stove. I've used one since 1978. More easily used. There's not always wood for a campfire and many places don't allow wood fires like in the Grand Canyon.

Gas stoves don't blacken cook pots as camp fires do. 

I use the MSR Pocket Rocket 2 stove and MSR Stowaway cook pot. Canisters come in three sizes depending on how much you'll cook during a hiking trip.

 

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Innovative Products Foldable Pocket Cooker
 

 This is the portable wood burning stove that i use for campsite camping

for solo camping i have 2  an esbit and  a light weight collapsible stove that disassembles and fits into a small bag

 

esbit.jpg
i also own a huge assortment of gas stoves... Classic 2 burner Coleman gas stove, coleman multi gas stove ( can even use gasoline) propane stoves and a few single burner stoves from REI and EMS

 

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caption

 

Having a bad back equates to trying to carry the least weight in my backpack as possible so hands  down i prefer to bring with me a ultra lightweight compact folding or collapsible stove and as a backup my ESBIT or a DIY alcohol penny stove ( soda can 2-3 inches high after cutting center out then u connect top and bottom together with a small drill bit u drill holes around the top and also on the  sides near the top of can  1/4 inch a part making a circle of holes and then you pour the 70 % + alcohol into the top then put a penny over the mouth piece)

Other then trying to carry as little weight as possible it is also nice to have a wood burning stove for times when you decide to stay longer then originally planned  . Nothing like being forced to either end a trip early or not to extend it cause you are out of gas umm literally and figuratively 

Oh and covering your pots  base with Aluminum foil will prevent them from turning black 

From a weight reduction POV: don't exactly understand why the backup is a wood burning stove, when a fire pit should suffice for contingency situations.

Ed 

Furthermore.. The Foldable Pocket Cooker wood stove weighs in at 2 pounds, per the OEM.  At that weight you can bring almost any canister stove, and a 16 oz canister, and still be schlepping less weight.  IMO That is a lot of weight for a Plan B cooking solution.

Ed

whomeworry  the foldable pocket stove thats 2 lbs is the stove i mentioned i bring for campsite cooking.  Lot of the campgrounds i go to do not provide fire pits and the fire pits i have weigh a ton and take up too much room in my SUV so I bring this instead .  It is not something i bring when backpack camping. As i agree it is just not worth the weight

For backpack camping i bring  a collapsible wood burning stove that weighs only a few ounces (think under 6oz) and the Esbit w/fuel tabs. 

Only if cooking for a group at a campsite would i bring the coleman 2 burner portable stove

 

October 23, 2021
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