Porter Carry Limit

6:59 p.m. on July 29, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

On the Inca trail the porter has a legal limit he can carry. 20 Kilo (22lbs) He carries two peoples stuff beyond what they carry in their day pack. Also, part of his weight limit is his own sleeping stuff. It is supposedly strictly enforced to protect the porters. So all the stuff on their list, which is required, must be in their back or on yours. I usually only carry my cameras, water, essential tidbits, rain gear, appropriate layer for the day. The rest goes into portered sack: all changes of cloths, laptop, sleeping bag/pad, kindle or book, camp shoes, layers required for trip but not in use that day. I am suddenly worried about the weight of my stuff.......

9:29 p.m. on July 29, 2014 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
4,534 reviewer rep
6,037 forum posts

Ummmm.... Karen, 20 kg is 44 pounds, not 22 pounds. Airline baggage allowance is 50 pounds or 23 kg per bag for most international flights, such as to Lima.

Allowed porter carry weights vary tremendously from place to place around the world and even within a given area. In the Cordillera Blanca part of the Andes in Peru, where the American Climber Science Program is doing most of its environmental research, we are dependent on a combination of burros, local human porters, and expedition members to transport the needed materials to and from campsites (tents and sleeping gear, food, cook gear, scientific gear, trash to be removed, etc). Llamas are not used in that part of the Andes, largely because they cannot carry much weight. Horses are not often used as pack animals or for carrying humans (a horse that was unladen was lost when it fell off a narrow trail across a steep slope that was easy for humans and burros to traverse - it was being brought to an archeological site ostensibly to provide transport for one of the archaeological researchers, not part of the ACSP group, who was handicapped).

One of our porters, Hugo, is shown in the following photo carrying 80 kg:


DSCN0511.jpg

I was carrying 30 kg myself at the time and felt overly laden. Burros are more typically limited to 40-50kg, and in many cases the porters are limited to 25-30 kg for carries of up to 15 km during the day (they usually carry only from the trailhead to base camp, though they may make 2 trips to relay all the gear and food). The amazing thing is that laden with that much, these porters will easily outpace any of us gringos, including on the uphill, which are often gains of 1000 or more meters trailhead to base camp. We are on our own for the advanced camps.

Karen, I would advise you carefully review your gear to see what you really need. Those of us in our expeditions soon decide we can do just fine with a minimum of clothes changes (no more than 1 change in a week, 1 pair of socks for the whole trip), and maybe a mini-pad instead of a laptop (electronic recording is vital for the scientific research and connection to some of the instrumentation). I keep the cameras at a mini P&S plus the DSLR for the vital image recording (plant and arthropod species that must be recorded in detail, plus during the archaeology section the artifacts). Tents get shared. Unfortunately it still adds up to 20-30kg per expedition member.

9:36 p.m. on July 29, 2014 (EDT)
0 reviewer rep
727 forum posts

Just a quick clarification. 20 kg vb is 44 pounds.

We didn't have any issues with this when we did the Inca trail to MP.

PW

5:55 a.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
1,994 reviewer rep
475 forum posts

If you start to think about it, you can easily trim A LOT of weight.


For instance... forget books, a kindle will do.

Laptop? Just bring a tablet unless you need to do work during your flights.

Changes of clothes? Go with merino or anti-bacterial impregnated synthetics to give you extra wear, also you can go with a variety of lightweight fabrics to save space and weight.

Camp shoes? TNF have some very light sneakers for that, or just bring a pair of crocs they arent too heavy.


Sleeping bag and pad? Depending on what you already have you may be able to cut a bunch of weight here. I just got a Multimat Superlight air pad which only weighs 300g and is quite comfortable!


For layers, there are a lot of lightweight options, packable primaloft stuff or really lightweight micro-down puffies etc...

9:40 a.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

Bill S said:

Karen, I would advise you carefully review your gear to see what you really need. Those of us in our expeditions soon decide we can do just fine with a minimum of clothes changes (no more than 1 change in a week, 1 pair of socks for the whole trip), and maybe a mini-pad instead of a laptop (electronic recording is vital for the scientific research and connection to some of the instrumentation). I keep the cameras at a mini P&S plus the DSLR for the vital image recording (plant and arthropod species that must be recorded in detail, plus during the archaeology section the artifacts). Tents get shared. Unfortunately it still adds up to 20-30kg per expedition member.

 When I went to Everest I was WAYYYYY overpacked. After the first day on trail the Guide had me leave a TON of stuff behind at the tea house. So I learned a little of that lessen. I am going to try to keep this to a real minimum. Bare essentials.

Of that 20 Kilo's, I am allotted 5. So 5 for me, 5 for mag and 10 for his own belongings. I don't pack the tent so that does not go into my total. I get what I pack on my back and11 pounds on the porter. I want my pack to be only the essentials for the day because I am slow enough as it is. Here is the link about the porter law.

Bill, Balz and TJ thanks so much. I am sorry I was not clear and had the math error. There is a reason I am a lawyer and not a scientist. Thank God I am not running around trying to figure out things like how much your prescription drugs should be and the stress load on bridges and your taxes!

9:46 a.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts


Blue-Sulpher.jpg

This is my camp shoe. It is a Vivobarefoot  Ultra Pure Running Shoe and

weighs 5 oz. I bring the laptop for blogging. It is big enough on my foot that I can wear a sock if cool at night. So this was even less than my crocks weighed. My clothing will now be cut back and that is ok. I want to bring one pocket camera and my Canon 60 D with an extra lens.  OH and of course, my trailspace hat and stickers.........

10:45 a.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
4,534 reviewer rep
6,037 forum posts

Trailspace hat and stickers are REQUIRED!! For cold weather, Trailspace Beanie is also REQUIRED!!

4:07 p.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

I have no Trailspace beanie....Seth? Dave?

7:44 p.m. on July 30, 2014 (EDT)
1,994 reviewer rep
475 forum posts

If space and weight is at a premium, have you considered ditching the SLR setup and opting for something like the Fujifilm X20?


Photography is one of my hobbies, and I was reluctant to leave behind my SLR setup, but found great results with the much smaller Fuji and really enjoy the space and weight savings for certain trips.

I am still learning how to use this camera, but I think so far I have gotten fairly good results with it on par with most peoples SLR photography.

here is a link to some Fuji X20 pics I have taken

https://www.flickr.com/photos/73947460@N04/sets/72157645228320517/

What bag and pad are you using?

8:59 a.m. on August 2, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

I have a great lil Canon my bro just bought and will bring it. I am thinking about not taking the 60D but will be so disapointed having bought Gary's zoom and all. I cannot say the model of the cannon off the top of my head...runs around 400 retail. Taking that today to test it out on my day hike.

10:12 a.m. on August 2, 2014 (EDT)
REVIEW CORPS
4,534 reviewer rep
6,037 forum posts

Basic rule - take the camera you are familiar with and know how to use with all its features. A "trip of a lifetime" is no place to start using a new camera.

Having said that, I have many times regretted leaving my top-level camera behind to save the weight and take a tiny, lightweight P&S. This dates back to film days as well as the "latest greatest" digital cameras

1:25 p.m. on August 2, 2014 (EDT)
295 reviewer rep
1,436 forum posts

I went most of the first 20 years of my backpacking life without a camera and it's regrettable. 

3:29 p.m. on August 2, 2014 (EDT)
490 reviewer rep
189 forum posts

If I could afford it.. I'd go with a Leica!

6:14 p.m. on August 2, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

It's a PowerShot G15. Much of it operates like the 60D as far as dials etc. Was soo easy to use on trail today. But I am not sure I will not still take my 60D. I want somne night shots of stars and stuff too.

9:51 a.m. on August 3, 2014 (EDT)
1,994 reviewer rep
475 forum posts

giftogab said:

It's a PowerShot G15. Much of it operates like the 60D as far as dials etc. Was soo easy to use on trail today. But I am not sure I will not still take my 60D. I want somne night shots of stars and stuff too.

Thats a great little camera, and with a bit of playing around you should be able to take some really nice photos.

9:59 a.m. on August 4, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

I was impressed with it! My brother's shots on Baker were really nice and my North Loop trail hike on Saturday yielded some good stuff too!

11:37 a.m. on August 4, 2014 (EDT)
TRAILSPACE STAFF TOP 25 REVIEWER
2,008 reviewer rep
4,454 forum posts

giftogab said:

I have no Trailspace beanie....Seth? Dave?

Hey Karen, have fun planning your trip. We don't have any beanies in the Trailspace headquarters office right now, but Seth is going to look for you as soon as he's back from Outdoor Retailer to see if he has any he can send you.

2:39 p.m. on August 5, 2014 (EDT)
612 reviewer rep
1,523 forum posts

COOL!

April 1, 2020
Quick Reply

Please sign in to reply

 
More Topics
This forum: Older: Location suggestions for Upstate / Western New York Newer: Off Trail Backpacking / Camping New England
All forums: Older: Seven Day Loop, Mineral King Sequoia NP Newer: Summit Packs