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Lafuma Active Light 37

rated 3.0 of 5 stars

The Active Light 37 has been discontinued. If you're looking for something new, check out the best overnight packs for 2022.

Reviews

1 review
5-star:   0
4-star:   0
3-star:   1
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

Backpack Review
by: daddiboy@aol.com
Manufacturer: Lafuma
Model: Active Light 37
Intended use: Daypack/Climbing/Skiing
Total volume (Manufacturer): 2250 ci.
Total volume (As tested): 1764 ci.
Unextended volume (As tested): N/A
Weight (Manufacturer): 1 lb. 5 oz.
Weight (As tested): 1 lb. 9 oz.
Height unextended: N/A
Height extended: 21 inches
Access: Top

Note: Total volume includes all pockets, lid, and main pack compartment(s) extended.

Volume was tested by filling the compartments with measured amounts of water. Weight tested is the complete pack as shipped from the manufacturer. Height is measured with the pack stuffed as full as possible while still being able to fully close all draw cords, zippers etc.

Construction features: Lightweight ripstop Cordura on the front, back and top. Cordura 700 on the sides and bottom. All interior surfaces have a heavy coat of waterproofing. The nylon strapping is medium weight; cordlocks and quick release buckles are nylon. The shoulder straps are approx. 5/8” thick by 2-1/4 inches wide, encased in Cordura on the outside and soft fleecy material inside. The waistband is simply Cordura outside and very thin foam padding inside covered with nylon mesh. It measures 6-1/2 inches wide at the back and 2 inches wide at the front. Stitching is 8 per inch, very neatly done as is the standard at Lafuma. Seams are not sealed but showed no pinholes of light when held under a lamp. Ykk zipper on the lid pocket.

Suspension: A 3/8” foam pad zips into the back and provides stability as well as cushions against sharp objects in the pack. While out on the trail it makes a great little seat or pad to stand on while bathing. The shoulder straps are not adjustable at the top, just sewn right on. The waistband is soft and acts only to keep the pack from swinging around; works well for that. No load lifter straps, back pads or lumbar pad.

Fitting: I feel the pack pretty much tops out at a 20 lb. load, mostly because of the lightweight waistband coupled with non adjustable shoulder straps and no load lifters, so it really “hangs” on me. Its plenty ridgid enough with the thick backpad to ride well with a light load inside, and does not flop around.

Amenities: The pack has side compression straps at the top only, which double as ski holders. The other end of the skiis slip into 2-3/4” wide nylon band at the bottom of the sides. There is one ax loop with a quick release buckle. A large 12”x5” nylon mesh pocket is on the bottom of the front of the pack; good for wet storage or a bottle. The main compartment closes with a drawstring and the top closes with a single buckle. The top has a small pocket with a 9” long YKK zipper. It holds approx. 60 ci., accessed at the back of the pack. Smallish bungie cord adorns the lid to stuff a sweater under. The sternum strap has a quick release buckle. The waistband has one of those neat zippered stash pockets on the right side for goodies.

Praise: I liked this pack with a light load. It snugs up tight and stays put. Very lightweight for the volume. Its nice to have the backpad available for a seat on wet ground and the waistband pocket is handy. The shoulder pads are very cushy. Liked the mesh front pocket.

Punishment: The pack needs lower compression straps in a big way. You really need to stuff it to keep it from flopping around. It would also be better with load lifter straps to lend a hand and a firmer waistband. I found the ax buckle smallish for my big clumbsy fingers.

Final verdict: Not a bad light load pack. Best suited for casual day hikes with lunch, survival gear and x-tra clothes. I give it a 3.75 out of 5.0 rating.

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