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The Montane Dart is a short-sleeved, synthetic shirt…

Rating: rated 4 of 5 stars
Source: received for testing via the Trailspace Review Corps (Sample for testing and review provided by Montane)

Summary

The Montane Dart is a short-sleeved, synthetic shirt that is an ideal year-round base layer (a long sleeved, quarter zip is also available). It wicks moisture away from the body very quickly, is exceptionally tailored, and protects the skin with a high UPF factor. If you’re looking to start your kit from skin out, I’d highly recommend it.

Pros

  • Slim fit
  • High UPF
  • Interior feels dry even when the outer is wet
  • No sweat lines
  • Resists odour
  • I'm a fan of the green colour
  • Flat stitched

Cons

  • Large, abrasive tag
  • Not a fan of the contrast stitching
  • Slightly more expensive than comparable offerings


F94CBBC5-EA0C-456D-9C83-3AAE6212D4E6.jpg(Short sleeve tee on the right, quarter zip long sleeve on the left)


0E24AABE-094D-4A0C-A3D6-35BC70447415.jpg

FIT AND COMFORT

The Dart fits exactly as I would design an active base layer to fit. Slim, without being restrictive, and with a little extra length in the hem. I am 6 foot, 170lbs and the size large fits perfectly. This is one of the main selling points to me, compared to a cheaper competitor's synthetic shirt. There is no extra baggy fabric around the stomach and chest to bunch up and the extra length keeps it tucked in under a waist belt or harness. Having a form fitted first layer also helps it layer with outer layers a lot easier. While I haven’t been able to use it like this for any real world uses, as the testing period has been throughout the summer, I have tried it on with my usual fall/winter layers and they work together nicely.

All the seams are flat-locked and moved off the top of the shoulders to minimize rub points. I recently noticed a couple of loose threads at the hem, nothing that is going to be the demise of the shirt, and I’m not sure if it came like that or if it’s the result of washing, but they will require a trim.


BAAA0472-A0D1-4D5F-A2E6-5FD797BF5FF5.jpg
Sleeve length and circumference are all perfect for an athletic build.

Printed on label on upper neck, however there was a massive tag on the hip that caused a lot of irritation, I cut it off promptly.

BF513993-F1F3-43EA-B481-266F2E464AA6.jpg

595E7A0E-EE4D-4D97-AC53-06BAB92D851F.jpg(Really overly large label the rubs right on the hip. Gets even worse if you're wearing a hip belt or harness.)

BF670862-6EF4-41D6-A10A-65799A6F7B8B.jpg(hacked it off)


MOISTURE

A real high point about this shirt is how well it deals with moisture. From Montane’s website…

“The Apex D-Fuse fabric has a dual layer construction, with an exceptionally soft and wicking pique knit next to the skin and a smooth, marl effect face.”

While I couldn’t read any more into this (the Montane website doesn’t even list the Apex fabric under its “technology” header) I am convinced it is working. This shirt moves moisture (sweat) away from the body better than any synthetic I’ve ever worn, and equally as well as wool.

On multiple occasions I’ve come home from a run, dripping in sweat, and the interior has felt dry to the touch. The shirt has dispersed the moisture over a greater surface area on the outer and the inner side of the shirt feels dry. This is a huge factor for me personally (as someone who sweats a lot), in which shirt I choose from the over-stuffed drawer of synthetic t-shirts. In terms of highly aerobic activities, like running or mountain biking, this greatly reduces the risk of chafing, in colder weather, and layering, it’s the first step in pushing the moisture away towards the outer layer before it freezes.

The surprising thing about the Dart is that while it is a little heavier (in terms of weight and fabric thickness, probably due to the double layer construction) (mine weighs 121 grams) it dries just as quickly as any other lightweight synthetic shirts. I laid out six similarly designed synthetic shirts that I already owned, everything from a cheap big-box retailer, to the outdoor industry competitors' shirts and the Dart came in fourth out of the seven. On average an hour of direct sun, flipping it occasionally, and it would be totally dry.


01A45644-E1A0-4D31-BC3A-77702F876BB3.jpg

BREATHABILITY

I can’t say I’ve ever noticed anything exceptional about the breathability of the Dart. I’m not sure if that is because it does such a good job moving moisture away that it is harder to notice a breeze coming through, or not, but again, I would say pretty average on that front. It certainly doesn’t feel clammy, even on a strenuous run in high humidity.

LAYERING

As I mentioned above I foresee this shirt being a really good mild winter base layer. It will obviously not be my first choice for extreme cold (as it lacks long sleeves and a hood) but for any high output, short duration trips it should work great. Paired with a highly breathable mid-layer, synthetic insulation or a fleece, would make for an ideal ice climbing, snowshoeing, cross country skiing, etc combo.

As mentioned above (see: fit) the extra hem length would allow you to tuck it in to your pants to seal off any gaps where cold air could creep in. Montane also makes the Dart in a full sleeve with a quarter zip for ventilation, (currently testing this model as well, review will come when I’ve had a chance to test it in some cooler fall temps).


25ED9065-D72C-420E-9D39-5C47C97C1823.jpg

OTHER

I love the high UPF (40+) factor for those exposed ridges and sun soaked beaches. Gives a nice piece of mind that you don’t have to rely entirely on chemical blockers.

Polygiene odour resistance treatment has been added to minimize the stink. I say minimize because short of wool, any synthetic is going to stink (after I exercise in it at least). I wouldn’t expect to go multiple days in a row wearing this, especially if I were going to be without a wash or rinse/seeing people, but I wouldn’t expect any synthetic shirt to do that. Weekend trips at the max for me, but that's saying something as I usually can only get a couple hours out of most synthetic shirts before they start to stink out.

It’s very superficial, but I love the green colour used on the Dart I received for testing. I’m not so hot, however, on the contrasting yellow/greenish (booger colour) stitching.

CONCLUSION

The Dart is an excellent synthetic shirt. Fantastic at keeping you dry, well tailored/designed to eliminate any chaffing or baggy material and boasting a strong UPF rating. It excelled during any high exertion activity and I believe it will work just as well as a base layer going forward into cooler temperatures.

CONDITIONS/TESTING

I have been testing the Dart over the past two months (August and September) throughout what has been a hot, muggy summer. It has been my primary shirt used for trail running, biking, adventure races, camping, and hiking. I’ve lost track of how many days of use it has on it (I wear it quite frequently for casual use as well, it’s quite comfortable and doesn’t look out of place in town).


F99EB63E-B34E-4B4E-A412-1FA63AD20A8F.jpg

My thanks to Trailspace and Montane for the opportunity to test the Dart t-shirt.

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Update:

A couple people have inquired about the drying times/ shirts compared. I initially didn't want to bog down the review with this info, but since people seem interested...

Shirts Tested: (I've included the product name if I actually remembered the specific model)

  • Lululemon Metal Vent Tech Tee (51% Polyester and 46% Nylon and 3% X-STATIC)
  • First Ascent (52% recycled polyester, 48% cocona polyester)
  • Nike (100% polyester)
  • Mountain Hardwear (96% polyester, 4% elastane)
  • Old Navy (100% polyester)
  • North Face Summit Series (100% polyester)
  • Montane Dart (100% polyester)


55DA0CB9-218B-42D3-B510-812253EFC1F1.jpgThe seven shirts listed, in order, from above.


935015AE-6459-41BC-BE2F-C38D5C9950A6.jpgEach was hung out to dry (full sun, slight breeze, approx 20 degrees Celsius)


8D722164-23F3-467E-931B-3CC6851CF17D.jpgIn order:

  1. Lululemon (1 hr, 7 mins)
  2. First Ascent (1 hr, 13 mins)
  3. North Face (1 hr, 23 mins)
  4. Montane (1 hr, 29 mins)
  5. Old Navy (1 hr, 40 mins)
  6. Nike (1 hr, 59 mins)
  7. Mountain Hardwear (2 hrs, 13 mins)
Alicia MacLeay TRAILSPACE STAFF

Nice review, Jake!


1 month ago
Michele Bullock

Great review Jake. Thanks for your time and effort. Curious about the other shirts you ranked with this one where this was 4 out of 7 for drying speed.


1 month ago
Jake W

Hi Michele, thanks for your comment. I did have a photo, and chart with approx drying times. I will look to add that to the review tonight (I didn't include the specifics as I didn't want to bog the review down but I've received a couple inquiries about this).


1 month ago
Alicia MacLeay TRAILSPACE STAFF

Good question, Michele! I'd also be curious to see that info.


1 month ago
Jake W

Dry time test info updated.


29 days ago
Michele Bullock

Jake - Thanks very much for the additional info and your scientific objective analysis!!! Very helpful for me as I sweat a lot and it becomes an issue in the cold.


28 days ago
Alicia MacLeay TRAILSPACE STAFF

Thanks, Jake!


27 days ago

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