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Hyperlite Mountain Gear Prism Alpine Climbing Kit

photo: Hyperlite Mountain Gear Prism Alpine Climbing Kit overnight pack (35-49l)

The Prism Alpine Climbing Kit includes Hyperlite Mountain Gear's:

Specs

Price Historic Range: $475.00

Reviews

1 review
5-star:   0
4-star:   1
3-star:   0
2-star:   0
1-star:   0

The Hyperlite Mountain Gear Prism Alpine Kit consists of the Prism Pack, Prism Ice Screw Case, and Prism Crampon Bag, and retails for $475usd. All three products are made with a combination of DCF fabrics designed to give you durability where you need it, while saving weight elsewhere.

I have reviewed all three items individually on their own merits (check out the individual reviews through the links below), so this review is to address them as a set.

Pros

  • Prism Pack
  • Ice Screw Case
  • Weight
  • Price
  • Durability
  • Compatibility

Cons

  • Crampon Case

C4A61093-8AE9-4D83-83A6-CB3010A71981.jpg
Prism Pack and Crampon Case 
9653140E-53C5-49B8-AA53-D0286E0952E5.jpg
Prism Ice Screw Case

Prism Alpine Climbing Kit

HMG's Prism Alpine Climbing Kit set is meant as a one-stop shop for climbers looking for a complete alpine carrying kit. Each individual item can be purchased on its own (follow the links for my individual reviews of each product), or together in this set.

  • The Prism Pack retails for $395 (carries heavy loads well, boasts a woven Dyneema face fabric on high wear areas so it's incredibly durable, and can be stripped down to be an ultralight climber's dream).
  • The Prism Ice Screw Case retails for $80 (less weight, more protection, easier to pack, higher price).
  • The Prism Crampon Bag retails for $50 (despite the high build quality...frustratingly small).
  • The entire Prism Alpine Climbing Kit set retails for $475.

Clearly there is some incentive to purchase the set as a whole, as you'll save $50 (USD), the cost of one crampon case, by buying the kit. In my opinion the Prism Pack alone is worth the retail cost of the entire set, and I think that in itself makes the kit a great value.

So, how do they all work when paired?

Well, the Prism Ice Screw Case is designed to fit in the Prism Pack perfectly (holy alliteration!), so there is no wasted space at all, and I much prefer its shape to the traditional cylindrical carrying case. These two products pair together very well. I also rated them individually 4.5 stars (Prism Pack) and 4 stars (Prism Ice Screw Case).

However, the Prism Crampon case to me is superfluous. The pack is already designed to carry your crampons in its outside crampon pocket. The pocket is more than large enough, easy to access, secure, and quite durable. I have no need to put my crampons in another bag just to place them in this pocket. It's just extra weight (slightly ironic as the company is founded on UL principles).

If you are purchasing this kit then you will receive a pack with a perfect place to carry crampons. The crampon case on its own could be useful should you have another pack with no way to carry crampons and if the case fits your crampons (see my crampon bag review), but I'm just addressing the Prism Alpine Climbing Kit as a whole here.

Would I recommend the Prism Alpine Climbing Kit?

Yes.

The Prism Pack and Prism Ice Screw Case are so well designed that they make the collection a success; the crampon case, to me, is just an added extra. The Prism Alpine Climbing kit streamlines the process of buying an alpine kit for anyone looking to get into the sport, or for anyone wanting to lower their overall base weight while increasing the durability of their setup.

Experience

I have been ice climbing for more than 12 years now, and have tested and used many packs and bags for carrying protection, including the HMG Ice pack.

Source: received for testing via the Trailspace Review Corps (Samples for testing and review provided by Hyperlite Mountain Gear)

About the Author

Jake Weston is the living Canadian epitome of a weekend warrior rolled up in a dad bod. Fond of craft beer, dogs, and anything that involves getting outside (bonus points if he can incorporate all three at once), he's dabbled in rock and ice climbing, hiking, camping (both backcountry and car), mountaineering, snowshoeing, and mountain biking. If it’s outside and active he's in...unless it’s snowboarding ("I like my ACL’s too much."). He’s also a dad to two young boys, Mastiff lover, husband, and small business owner.

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