Retailers' Descriptions

Here's what other sites are saying:

The Salomon Men's Quest Origins 2 GTX Hiking Boot is a rugged hiking boot that conquers towering peaks, hardwood forests, and intermittent stream crossings with weatherproof protection and aggressive traction. Gore-Tex Extended Comfort provides the legendary waterproofing you've come to expect from Gore-Tex, but with higher levels of breathability during active use on the trail. The full-grain leather upper is tough-wearing, resisting trail abrasion while promoting smooth-wearing comfort. Absorbing excess shock, the Ortholite footbed promotes excellent cushioning with every step. Salomon's 4D Advanced Chassis combines dynamic support with sure-footed stability needed for technical trails. To ensure maximum grip, the Contagrip sole combines multiple rubber densities with aggressive lugs for optimal traction when you're peak-bagging or navigating across forests.

- Backcountry.com refers to the men's version

Salomon Footwear Quest Origins 2 GTX Backpacking Boot - Women's-Pinot/Noir-Medium-5 L390274005.

- CampSaver.com refers to the men's version

Features of the Salomon Men's Quest Origins 2 GTX Boot Full grain leather Full leather Upper Mud guard Protective rubber toe cap Protective rubber heel Gore-Tex Non marking contagrip 4d advanced chassis Molded EVA Molded shank EVA shaped Footbed Ortholite

- Moosejaw refers to the men's version

Where to Buy

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previously retailed for:
$148.47 - $269.99

The Salomon Quest Origins 2 GTX is not available from the stores we monitor. It was last seen October 7, 2018 at Backcountry.com.

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